5 Uses For Spent Coffee Grounds

Wake Up World | Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world. It’s grown in over 70 countries and amounts to over 16 billion pounds of beans every year.

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Free access to online information under threat from TPP

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership are being kept secret but there are clues about what may be in store for Canada if we look at Australia’s experience with AUSFTA. Cynthia Khoo is a communications and community engagement volunteer with OpenMedia.ca and a recent law graduate from the University of Victoria. Cynthia Khoo speaks with Redeye host Esther Hsieh

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Biological Fallout of Fracking Still Largely Unknown: Scientists

Photo courtesy of EcoFlight Activist Post In the United States, natural-gas production from shale rock has increased by more than 700 percent since 2007. Yet scientists still do not fully understand the industry’s effects on nature and wildlife, according to a report in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment .

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Professor Ilan Papp

As the Palestinian death toll tops 1,000 in Gaza, we are joined from Haifa by Israeli professor and historian Ilan Pappé. “I think Israel in 2014 made a decision that it prefers to be a racist apartheid state and not a democracy,” Pappé says. “It still hopes that the United States will license this decision and provide it with the immunity to continue, with the necessary implication of such a policy vis-à-vis the Palestinians wherever they are.” A professor of history and the director of the European Centre for Palestine Studies at the University of Exeter, Pappé is the author of several books, including most recently, “The Idea of Israel: A History of Power and Knowledge.”

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Why ISIS Blew Up Jonah’s Tomb, And Why It Might Backfire

Fighters march through the ISIS stronghold of Raqaa, Syria. CREDIT: AP Images Last week, members of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), the ruthless militant group currently marauding through Iraq, reportedly blew up the tomb of the Prophet Yunus. The burial site of Yunus, commonly known to many Christians as the biblical figure Jonah, was located in the modern-day city of Mosul (once the biblical city of Nineveh), and was seen by many archeologists and religious scholars as an ancient — and precious — religious artifact

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The Pariah State

‘From abroad, we are accustomed to believe that Eretz Israel is presently almost totally desolate, an uncultivated desert, and that anyone wishing to buy land there can come and buy all he wants. But in truth it is not so … [Our brethren in Eretz Israel] were slaves in their land of exile and they suddenly find themselves with unlimited freedom … This sudden change has engendered in them an impulse to despotism as always happens when “a slave becomes king,” and behold they walk with the Arabs in hostility and cruelty, unjustly encroaching on them.’ Ahad Ha’am, 1891; cited in Shlomo Sand, The Invention of the Land of Israel, 2012. ‘If Lord Shaftesbury was literally inexact in describing Palestine as a country without a people, he was essentially correct, for there is no Arab people living in intimate fusion with the country, utilizing its resources and stamping it with a characteristic impress; there is at best an Arab encampment.’ Israel Zangwill, 1920; cited in Naseer Aruri, ed., Palestinian Refugees, 2001.

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Los Angeles water main break points to failing national infrastructure

Tuesday’s water main break at the University of California Los Angeles underscores the danger of the failing, ancient, water infrastructure beneath the nation’s cities.

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Plans For Massive Amusement Park Overlap With Endangered Florida Forest

Pine rockland forest CREDIT: Chris M. Morris/flickr The recent sale of a section of pine rocklands forest, a critically endangered ecosystem in South Florida, by the University of Miami to a developer planning to build a Walmart, Chick-fil-A, LA Fitness and 900 apartments has caused quite a stir, but it isn’t the only threat to the forest.

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Drilling in the Dark

As production of shale gas soars, the industry’s effects on nature and wildlife remain largely unexplored, according to a study by a group of conservation biologists published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment on August 1. The report emphasizes the need to determine the environmental impact of chemical contamination from spills, well-casing failure, and other accidents.

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Meat-eating dinosaurs shrank over 50 million year period to evolve into birds

Theropods underwent 12 stages of miniaturisation – from 163kg beasts to becoming the first birds on Earth, study finds Huge meat-eating dinosaurs shrank steadily over 50 million years to evolve into small, flying birds, researchers say. The branch of theropod dinosaurs which gave rise to modern birds decreased inexorably in size from 163kg beasts that roamed the land, to birds weighing less than 1kg over the period.

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